Monday, 28 February 2011

I Am Number Four Review














I Am Number Four


Release Date: 24th February 2011 - Australia


Production Companies
DreamWorks SKG (presents)
Reliance Big Entertainment (presents)
Bay Films

Distribution
Walt Disney Studios Motion 
Pictures Australia


Genre: Sci-Fi

Rating: M

Runtime:
112 minutes


Budget: $50,000,000

Box Office Gross: $149,878,437
(Worldwide)


Plot Summary
Three are dead. He is 
Number Four. D.J. Caruso 
helms an action-packed 
thriller about an extraordinary 
teen, John Smithwho is a 
fugitive on the run from ruthless 
enemies sent to destroy him. 
Changing his identity, moving 
from town to town with his 
guardian Henri, John is always 
the new kid with no ties to 
his past. 

In the small Ohio town he now 
calls home, John encounters 
unexpected, life-changing 
events-his first love, powerful 
new abilities and a connection 
to the others who share his 
incredible destiny. 


Cast
Alex Pettyfer - John Smith/

Number 4
Timothy Olyphant - Henri
Teresa Palmer - Number 6
Dianna Agron - Sarah Hart
Callan McAuliffe - Sam
Kevin Durand - Mogadorian 

Commander
Jake Abel - Mark 

Jeff Hochendoner - Sheriff James

Crew 

Based on a Novel "I Am 
Number Four" - Jobie Hughes 
James Frey
Director - D.J. Caruso
Screenplay - Alfred Gough, 

Miles Millar & Marti Noxon
Producer - Michael Bay

Cinematography - Guillermo 
Navarro 
Visual Effects Supervisor: ILM - Bill George
Visual Effects Supervisor - Gregory L. McMurry
Film Editors - Vince Filippone 

& Jim Page 
Music - Trevor Rabin 


Review
I AM NUMBER FOUR is an action-packed thrill ride from start to finish and has lots of action. It has an interesting story that keeps you on edge throughout the movie and almost feels like a sci-fi version of TWLIGHT. This movie is complimented with good acting performances from Alex Pettyfer and Timothy Olyphant and has a CGI dog that transforms into a beastly monster.

Star rating: (4/5) Good Movie



Despicable Me Review (Updated)













Despicable Me


Release Date: 9th September 2010 – Australia


Production Companies
Universal Pictures (presents)

Illumination Entertainment

Distribution
Universal Pictures Australia


Genre: Animation/Family

Rating: PG

Runtime: 95 minutes



Budget: $69,000,000

Box Office Gross: $543,113,985
(Worldwide)


Plot Summary
In a happy suburban 

neighbourhood surrounded 
by white picket fences and 
flowering rose bushes sits a 
black house with a dead 
lawn. Unbeknownst to the 
neighbourshidden deep 
beneath this home is a vast 
secret hideout. Surrounded 
by an army of mischievous 
little minions called Minions, 
we discover Gru planning 
the biggest heist in the 
history of the world. 

He is going to steal the moon 
(Yes, the moon!). Gru 
delights in all things wicked. 
Armed with his arsenal of 
shrink rays, freeze rays, and 
battle-ready vehicles for land 
and air, he vanquishes all 
who stand in his way. 
That is, until the day he 
encounters the immense will 
of three little orphaned girls 
who look at him and see 
something that no one else 
has ever seen: a potential 
Dad. One of the world's 
greatest super-villains has 
just met greatest challenge: 
three little girls named 
Margo, Edith and Agnes. 


Voice Cast
Steve Carell – Gru
Jason Segel – Vector
Russell Brand – Dr. Nefario
Julie Andrews – Gru's Mom
Will Arnett – Mr. Perkins
Kristen Wiig – Miss Hattie
Miranda Cosgrove – Margo
Dana Gaier – Edith
Elsie Fisher – Agnes
Pierre Coffin 
– Tim the Minion/
Various Minions 
Chris Renaud – Dave the Minion/
Various Minions
Jermaine Clement – Kevin & 
Jerry the Minions 
Jack McBrayer – Carnival Barker/
Tourist Dad
Ken Jeong – Talk Show Host
Danny McBride – Fred McDade
Mindy Kaling – Tourist Mom

Crew 

Directors – Pierre Coffin & Chris Renaud
Story/Executive Producer – Sergio Pablos
Screenplay – Ken Daurio & Cinco Paul
Producers – John Cohen, Janet Healy & 

Christopher Meledandri
Production Designer – Yarrow Cheney
Art Director/Character Designer – Eric Guillon
Character Designer – Carter Goodrich 
Animation Supervisor – Laurent de la 
Chapelle
Animation Director – Lionel Gallat
Layout Supervisor  Kyle Balda
Computer Graphics Supervisor  Bruno Chauffard
Film Editors – Gregory Perler & 
Pam Ziegenhagen
Score Producer – Hans Zimmer
Music – Heitor Pereira
Composer: Songs/Theme Music – Pharrell Williams


Review 
I never imagine that DESPICABLE ME is such a bouquet to the other great animated comedies, but it doesn't turn the tables from making this a movie very much alike for its own personality. It has some inspiration of humour coming it out from the Looney Tunes shorts and featuring rare heartfelt moments that could have come from a Pixar film. I praise Steve Carell's amazing performance as Gru and the hilarious parts including where Gru attempts to break into Vector's home, Dr Nefario shows Gru his two new inventions and the tiny toilet scene involving Vector. 

DESPICABLE ME is a terrific and hilarious animated movie that is released in both 2D & 3D and has plenty of laughs and heart that will amaze children and will please the adults.

Star rating: (4/5) Good Movie



Monday, 21 February 2011

Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back Review














Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back


Release Date: 7th August 1980 – Australia


Production Companies 
20th Century Fox
Lucasfilm

Genre: Sci-Fi

Rating: PG

Runtime: 124 minutes
               127 minutes
               (Special Edition)


Budget: $32,000,000

Box Office Gross: $547,969,004
(Worldwide)


Plot Summary
It is a dark time for the
Rebellion. After a
devastating attack on
their ice base on the
frozen planet of Hoth,
the Rebels are scattered
by Imperial pursuit. Luke
Skywalker seeks out the
mysterious Jedi Master
Yoda in the swamps of
Dagobah, while Han Solo
and Princess Leia outrun
the Imperial fleet to the
beautiful Cloud City of
Bespin. In an attempt to
convert Luke to the dark
side, the evil Darth Vader
lures young Skywalker
into a trap. In the midst of
a fierce lightsaber duel with
the Sith Lord, Luke faces
a terrible truth about the
Skywalker legacy.


Cast
Mark Hamill - Luke Skywalker
Harrison Ford - Han Solo
Carrie Fisher - Princess Leia Organa
David Prowse - Darth Vader
Billy Dee Williams - Lando Calrissian
Anthony Daniels - C3PO
Kenny Baker - R2D2
Peter Mayhew - Chewbacca
Frank Oz - Yoda
James Earl Jones - Darth Vader (Voice)
Marjorie Eaton - The Emperor (Uncredited)
Clive Revill - The Emperor (Voice)
Denis Lawson - Wedge Antilles
Ian McDiarmid - The Emperor
(2004 DVD Release)
Jeremy Bulloch - Boba Fett
Jason Wingreen - Boba Fett
(Voice) (Uncredited)
Temuera Morrison - Boba Fett
(Voice) (2004 DVD Release)

Crew
Director - Irvin Kershner
Producers - Gary Kurtz &
Rick McCallum (Special
Edition)
Writers - Leigh Brackett &
Lawrence Kasdan
Story/Executive Producer/
Editor (Uncredited) - George
Lucas
Production Designer - Norman Reynolds
Design Consultant/
Conceptual Artist/Matte
Artist: Miniature & Optical Effects Unit - Ralph McQuarrie
Costume Designer - John Mollo
Cinematography - Peter
Suschitzky, BSC
Make-Up & Special Creature Designer -
Stuart Freeborn
Stunt Coordinator - Peter Diamond
Editors - Paul Hirsch, Marcia Lucas (Uncredited) &
T.M. Christopher (Special Edition)
Special Visual Effects - Richard Edlund
& Brian Johnson
Supervising Sound Editor/Sound Designer -
Ben Burtt
Music - John Williams


Awards

1981 Academy Awards
Best Sound - Bill Varney, Steve Maslow,
Gregg Landaker & Peter Sutton (Won)
Special Achievement for Visual Effects - Brian
Johnson, Richard Edlund, Dennis Muren &
Bruce Nicholson (Won)
----------------
Best Art Direction - Norman Reynolds,
Leslie Dilley, Harry Lange, Alan Tomkins
& Michael Ford (Nominated)
Best Original Score - John Williams (Nominated)


Review
The fans of Star Wars were definitely right, THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK is the darkest and best movie of the classic trilogy, because it has everything that the first movie didn't have such as a brilliant story and more character development. I loved the film's characters such as Yoda, Lando Calrissian and Boba Fett, the scenes of which include the Battle of Hoth that has the snow-speeders, Han in the Millennium Falcon getting chased by Imperial fleet in the asteroid belt, the cliff-hanger ending and the light-saber duel between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker which has the shocking and iconic moment where Vader says in his infamous quote to Luke, "No, I am your father".

EMPIRE has been considered a true classic sci-fi film and one of my favourites of all time that I've ever watched.

Star rating: (5/5) Best Movie Ever

Monday, 14 February 2011

Fantasia Review (Updated)








Fantasia


Release Date: 21st August 1941 - Australia


Production Companies
Walt Disney Pictures

Distribution
Walt Disney Studios Motion
Pictures Australia


Genre: Animation/Family

Rating: G

Runtime: 124 minutes


Budget: $2,280,000

Box Office Gross: $83,507,924
(Worldwide)

 
Plot Summary
Unforgettable images are
brought to life by some
of the world's best music -
the comedy of Mickey Mouse
as a trouble-making sorcerer's
apprentice, the beauty of
winged fairies and cascading
snowflakes, even plump
hippos performing ballet in
tutus!


Cast
Leopold Stokowski - Himself -
The Conductor of The
Philadelphia Orchestra
Deems Taylor - Himself -
Narrative Introductions
Walt Disney - Mickey Mouse
in 'The Sorcerer's Apprentice'
(Voice) (Uncredited)
Crew
Directors - Samuel Armstrong
(Toccata and Fugue in D
Minor & The Nutcracker
Suite),
James Algar (The Sorcerer's
Apprentice), Bill Roberts &
Paul Satterfield (The Rite of
Spring),
Ford Beebe, Jim Handley &
Hamilton Luske (The
Pastoral Symphony), Norman
Ferguson & T. Hee
(Dance of the Hours) & Wilfred
Jackson (Night on Bald
Mountain/Ave Maria)
Story Direction - Joe Grant &
Dick Huemer
Story Development - Phil
Dike (Toccata and Fugue
in D Minor & Night on Bald
Mountain/Ave Maria),
Lee Blair & Elmer Plummer
(Toccata and Fugue in D Minor),
Sylvia Moberly-Holland,
Norman Wright, Albert Heath,
Bianca Majolie & Graham Heid
(The Nutcracker Suite), Perce
Pearce & Carl Fallberg (The
Sorcerer's Apprentice), Otto
Englander, Webb Smith,
Erdman Penner, Joseph Sabo,
Bill Peet & Vernon Stallings
(The Pastoral Symphony) &
Campbell Grant & Arthur
Heinemann (Night on Bald
Mountain/Ave Maria)
Story Development &
Research (Rite of Spring) -
William Martin, Leo Thiele,
Robert Sterner & John
McLeish
Producer - Walt Disney
Producer (Uncredited)/
Production Supervisor - Ben Sharpsteen
Cinematography - James
Wong Howe (Uncredited)


Awards

1942 Academy Awards
Honorary Awards - Leopold Stokowski (and his associates),
Walt Disney, William E. Garity and J.N.A. Hawkins (Won)


Review 
One of the Disney's really great animated classics, FANTASIA is an amazing film that mixes classical music and animation together in a blend and it is unlike that you never seen before. I praise four of its eight animated segments that are part of this classic movie which includes Nutcracker Suite, Night on Bald Mountain/Ave Maria, Dance of the Hours and last but not least my favourite, the Sorcerer's Apprentice which stars Mickey Mouse and is the famous and probably the best piece of all in the original FANTASIA. 

With all of its beautiful images and a dash of creativity, FANTASIA is such a special film that Walt Disney has ever done and he made this into a work of art that it will never be forgotten by anyone especially families or Disney lovers. For fans of this animated feature, you can now buy or hire it and its sequel FANTASIA 2000 (click here) on Blu-ray & DVD. 

Star rating: (4/5) Good Movie



Monday, 7 February 2011

83rd Academy Awards (Updated)





Broadcast - Australia - 28th February 2011


Actor in a Leading Role

  • Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”
  • Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”
  • Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”
  • Colin Firth in “The King's Speech”
  • James Franco in “127 Hours”
Actor in a Supporting Role
  • Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
  • John Hawkes in “Winter's Bone”
  • Jeremy Renner in “The Town”
  • Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”
  • Geoffrey Rush in “The King's Speech”
Actress in a Leading Role
  • Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”
  • Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”
  • Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter's Bone”
  • Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
  • Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”
Actress in a Supporting Role
  • Amy Adams in “The Fighter”
  • Helena Bonham Carter in “The King's Speech”
  • Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”
  • Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”
  • Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”
Animated Feature Film
  • “How to Train Your Dragon” - Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois
  • “The Illusionist” - Sylvain Chomet
  • “Toy Story 3” - Lee Unkrich
Art Direction
  • “Alice in Wonderland”
    Production Design: Robert Stromberg; Set Decoration: Karen O'Hara
  • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1”
    Production Design: Stuart Craig; Set Decoration: Stephenie McMillan
  • “Inception”
    Production Design: Guy Hendrix Dyas; Set Decoration: Larry Dias and Doug Mowat
  • “The King's Speech”
    Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Judy Farr
  • “True Grit”
    Production Design: Jess Gonchor; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh
Cinematography
  • “Black Swan” - Matthew Libatique
  • “Inception” - Wally Pfister
  • “The King's Speech” - Danny Cohen
  • “The Social Network” - Jeff Cronenweth
  • “True Grit” - Roger Deakins
Costume Design
  • “Alice in Wonderland” - Colleen Atwood
  • “I Am Love” - Antonella Cannarozzi
  • “The King's Speech” - Jenny Beavan
  • “The Tempest” - Sandy Powell
  • “True Grit” - Mary Zophres
Directing
  • “Black Swan” - Darren Aronofsky
  • “The Fighter” - David O. Russell
  • “The King's Speech” - Tom Hooper
  • “The Social Network” - David Fincher
  • “True Grit” - Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Documentary (Feature)
  • “Exit through the Gift Shop” - Banksy and Jaimie D'Cruz
  • “Gasland” - Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic
  • “Inside Job” - Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs
  • “Restrepo” - Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger
  • “Waste Land” - Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley
Documentary (Short Subject)
  • “Killing in the Name” - Jed Rothstein
  • “Poster Girl” - Sara Nesson and Mitchell W. Block
  • “Strangers No More” - Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon
  • “Sun Come Up” - Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger
  • “The Warriors of Qiugang” - Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon
Film Editing
  • “Black Swan” - Andrew Weisblum
  • “The Fighter” - Pamela Martin
  • “The King's Speech” - Tariq Anwar
  • “127 Hours” - Jon Harris
  • “The Social Network” - Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter
Foreign Language Film
  • “Biutiful” (Mexico)
  • “Dogtooth” (Greece)
  • “In a Better World” (Denmark)
  • “Incendies” (Canada)
  • “Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi)” (Algeria)
Makeup
  • “Barney's Version” - Adrien Morot
  • “The Way Back” - Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk and Yolanda Toussieng
  • “The Wolfman” - Rick Baker and Dave Elsey
Music (Original Score)
  • “How to Train Your Dragon” - John Powell
  • “Inception” - Hans Zimmer
  • “The King's Speech” - Alexandre Desplat
  • “127 Hours” - A.R. Rahman
  • “The Social Network” - Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
Music (Original Song)
  • “Coming Home” from “Country Strong” Music and Lyrics by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
  • “I See the Light” from “Tangled” Music by Alan Menken Lyrics by Glenn Slater
  • “If I Rise” from “127 Hours” Music by A.R. Rahman Lyrics by Dido and Rollo Armstrong
  • “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3" Music and Lyrics by Randy Newman
Best Picture
  • “Black Swan” - Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers
  • “The Fighter” - David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman and Mark Wahlberg, Producers
  • “Inception” - Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers
  • “The Kids Are All Right” - Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte and Celine Rattray, Producers
  • “The King's Speech” - Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers
  • “127 Hours” - Christian Colson, Danny Boyle and John Smithson, Producers
  • “The Social Network” - Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ce├ín Chaffin, Producers
  • “Toy Story 3” - Darla K. Anderson, Producer
  • “True Grit” - Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, Producers
  • “Winter's Bone" - Anne Rosellini and Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Producers
Short Film (Animated)
  • “Day & Night” - Teddy Newton
  • “The Gruffalo” - Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
  • “Let's Pollute” - Geefwee Boedoe
  • “The Lost Thing” - Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann
  • “Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary)” - Bastien Dubois
Sound Editing
  • “Inception” - Richard King
  • “Toy Story 3” - Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
  • “TRON: Legacy” - Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
  • “True Grit” - Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
  • “Unstoppable” - Mark P. Stoeckinger
Sound Mixing
  • “Inception” - Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick
  • “The King's Speech” - Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen and John Midgley
  • “Salt” - Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan and William Sarokin
  • “The Social Network” - Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick and Mark Weingarten
  • “True Grit” - Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland
Visual Effects
  • “Alice in Wonderland” - Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips
  • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1” - Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi
  • “Hereafter” - Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojansky and Joe Farrell
  • “Inception” - Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb
  • “Iron Man 2” - Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick
Writing (Adapted Screenplay)
  • “127 Hours” - Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy
  • “The Social Network” - Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin
  • “Toy Story 3” - Screenplay by Michael Arndt; Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
  • “True Grit” - Written for the Screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
  • “Winter's Bone” - Adapted for the Screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini
Writing (Original Screenplay)
  • “Another Year” - Written by Mike Leigh
  • “The Fighter” - Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson;
    Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson
  • “Inception” - Written by Christopher Nolan
  • “The Kids Are All Right” - Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg
  • “The King's Speech” - Screenplay by David Seidler

Tuesday, 1 February 2011

In Memory of John Barry (1933-2011) (Updated)





John Barry (1933-2011)


John Barry, the Oscar-winning film
score composer who was known
for composing the score of the 11
James Bond movies and for
arranging the "James Bond theme",
died of a heart attack at his home
in Oyster Bay, New York, United
States on 30th of January 2011, he
was 77 years old.

He began composing the Bond movies starting with 'Dr. No', he has composed every Bond movie (except for 'Live and Let Die', 'The Spy Who Loved Me' and 'For Your Eyes Only'), right up to his last Bond score on 'The Living Daylights' which is Timothy Dalton's first Bond movie in the series. He also composed film scores for 'Midnight Cowboy', 'Out of Africa' and 'Dances with Wolves'.